Where Does It Hurt

October 2015Where Does It Hurt?: Healing Wounds From the Past and Present
October, 2015

Summary:

Pain is an excellent navigator on the path to wisdom. Though we might prefer to be pain free, this is impossible in human life, where all things are impermanent. The question is, How can we learn to use pain as a doorway to insight and healing? If pain is the answer then what is the question? How do our wounds shape our characters as we move through the trauma of everyday life? What is the relationship between blessing (acceptance) and transformation? We’re delighted to have renowned meditation teacher, Tara Brach as this month’s guest interview.

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Guest Interview with Tara Brach


Tara Brach

Tara BrachTara Brach’s teachings blend Western psychology and Eastern spiritual practices, mindful attention to our inner life, and a full, compassionate engagement with our world. The result is a distinctive voice in Western Buddhism, one that offers a wise and caring approach to freeing ourselves and society from suffering.

As an undergraduate at Clark University, Tara pursued a double major in psychology and political science. During this time, while working as a grass roots organizer for tenants’ rights, she also began attending yoga classes and exploring Eastern approaches to inner transformation. After college, she lived for ten years in an ashram—a spiritual community—where she practiced and taught both yoga and concentrative meditation. When she left the ashram and attended her first Buddhist Insight Meditation retreat, led by Joseph Goldstein, she realized she was home. “I had found wisdom teachings and practices that train the heart and mind in unconditional and loving presence,” she explains. “I knew that this was a path of true freedom.”

Over the following years, Tara earned a Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from the Fielding Institute, with a dissertation exploring meditation as a therapeutic modality in treating addiction. She went on to complete a five-year Buddhist teacher training program at the Spirit Rock Meditation Center, under the guidance of Jack Kornfield. Working as both a psychotherapist and a meditation teacher, she found herself naturally blending these two powerful traditions—introducing meditation to her therapy clients and sharing western psychological insights with meditation students. This synthesis has evolved, in more recent years, into Tara’s groundbreaking work in training psychotherapists to integrate mindfulness strategies into their clinical work.